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Book Club List

The World Peace Diet by Dr. Will Tuttle
The World Peace Diet, which became a #1 Amazon best-seller in March, 2010, offers a compelling and liberating new understanding of our food and our culture. It has been called one of the most important books of the 21st century: the foundation of a new society based on the truth of the interconnectedness of all life. It is the first book to make explicit the invisible connections between our culture, our food, and the source of our broad range of problems—and the way to a positive transformation in our individual and collective lives.
The World Peace Diet is an award-winning. If you want to understand the big picture of our culture and why we have the unyielding dilemmas we face, and how we can solve them, this book is for you.

Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer
Jonathan Safran Foer spent much of his teenage and college years oscillating between omnivore and vegetarian. But on the brink of fatherhood—facing the prospect of having to make dietary choices on a child's behalf—his casual questioning took on urgency. His quest for answers ultimately required him to visit factory farms in the middle of the night, dissect the emotional ingredients of meals from his childhood, and probe some of his most primal instincts about right and wrong. Brilliantly synthesizing philosophy, literature, science, memoir, and his own detective work, Eating Animals explores the many fictions we use to justify our eating habits—from folklore to pop culture to family traditions and national myth—and how such tales can lull us into a barbaric forgetting.

Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan
Omnivore’s Dilemma is not a book with a particular vegan view. However, this book is eye opening on all food sources (and surprising uses!) including organic veggies. Without trying to give too much away, here is a “vegan” review of the book I found on line http://www.satyamag.c...
About the book: In this groundbreaking book, one of America’s most fascinating, original, and elegant writers turns his own omnivorous mind to the seemingly straightforward question of what we should have for dinner. To find out, Pollan follows each of the food chains that sustain us—industrial food, organic or alternative food, and food we forage ourselves—from the source to a final meal, and in the process develops a definitive account of the American way of eating. His absorbing narrative takes us from Iowa cornfields to food-science laboratories, from feedlots and fast-food restaurants to organic farms and hunting grounds, always emphasizing our dynamic coevolutionary relationship with the handful of plant and animal species we depend on. Each time Pollan sits down to a meal, he deploys his unique blend of personal and investigative journalism to trace the origins of everything consumed, revealing what we unwittingly ingest and explaining how our taste for particular foods and flavors reflects our evolutionary inheritance.
The surprising answers Pollan offers to the simple question posed by this book have profound political, economic, psychological, and even moral implications for all of us. Beautifully written and thrillingly argued, The Omnivore’s Dilemma promises to change the way we think about the politics and pleasure of eating. For anyone who reads it, dinner will never again look, or taste, quite the same.

The Ethics of What We Eat by Peter Singer and Jim Mason
Editorial Review From Publisher's Weekly: Ethicist Singer and co-author Mason (Animal Factories) document corporate deception, widespread waste and desensitization to inhumane practices in this consideration of ethical eating. The authors examine three families' grocery-buying habits and the motivations behind those choices. One woman says she's "absorbed in my life and my family...and I don't think very much about the welfare of the meat I'm eating," while a wealthier husband and wife mull the virtues of "triple certified" coffee, buying local and avoiding chocolate harvested by child slave labor, though "no one seems to be pondering that as they eat." In investigating food production conditions, the authors' first-hand experiences alternate between horror and comedy, from slaughterhouses to artificial turkey-insemination ("the hardest, fastest, dirtiest, most disgusting, worst-paid work"). This sometimes-graphic exposé is not myopic: profitability and animal welfare are given equal consideration, though the reader finishes the book agreeing with the authors' conclusion that "America's food industry seeks to keep Americans in the dark about the ethical components of their food choices." A no-holds-barred treatise on ethical consumption, this is an important read for those concerned with the long, frightening trip between farm and plate.

The China Study by Dr. T. Colin Campbell
Drawing on the project findings in rural China, but going far beyond those findings, The China Study details the connection between nutrition and heart disease, diabetes and cancer. The report also examines the source of nutritional confusion produced by powerful lobbies, government entities, and opportunistic scientists. The New York Times has recognized the study (China-Oxford-Cornell Diet and Health Project) as the "Grand Prix of epidemiology" and the "most comprehensive large study ever undertaken of the relationship between diet and the risk of developing disease."
See more at: http://thechinastudy....
Ishmael by Daniel Quinn
Ishmael is a 1992 philosophical novel. It examines mythology, its effect on ethics, and how that relates to sustainability. The novel uses a style of Socratic dialogue to deconstruct the notion that humans are the end product, the pinnacle of biological evolution. It posits that human supremacy is a cultural myth, and asserts that modern civilization is enacting that myth.

Ishmael by Daniel Quinn
Ishmael is a 1992 philosophical novel. It examines mythology, its effect on ethics, and how that relates to sustainability. The novel uses a style of Socratic dialogue to deconstruct the notion that humans are the end product, the pinnacle of biological evolution. It posits that human supremacy is a cultural myth, and asserts that modern civilization is enacting that myth.

Change of Heart:What Psychology Can Teach Us About Spreading Social Change by Nick Cooney
Scientific research has generated a wealth of information on how people can be persuaded to alter their behaviors, yet this body of knowledge has been largely ignored by those working to improve society. "Change of Heart: What Psychology Can Teach Us About Spreading Social Change" brings this information to light so that non-profits, community organizers and others can make science-driven decisions in their advocacy work. The book examines over 80 years of empirical research in areas including social psychology, communication studies, diffusion studies, network systems and social marketing, distilling the highlights into easy-to-use advice and serving as a psychology primer for anyone wanting to spread progressive social change.

The Face on Your Plate - The Truth About Food by Jeffrey Masson
Each bite of meat involves the killing of an animal that did not need to die, Masson (When Elephants Weep) reminds readers, and if the advocacy of a completely vegan diet (neither milk nor eggs, in addition to giving up meat and fish) is not particularly new—even Masson acknowledges that he is following the path laid out by authors like Temple Grandin and Michael Pollan—the passion with which the argument is made is immediately apparent. Masson explains the scientific background in simple, effective prose, pointing to the vast environmental damage caused by the modern agriculture-industrial complex, then slams the emotional point home by underscoring the plaintive cries of a calf separated from a mother cow or the psychological stress that hens endure when thrust into small cages. Masson argues that a vegan diet is sufficient to provide us with all the nutrients we need to thrive, using his own daily menus as an example, but his most powerful argument calls upon the power of empathy and a refusal to put animals through suffering.

Vegan for Life by Jack Norris and Virginia Messina
The reviews say that Vegan For Life is the quickest way to get up to speed on how to cover all your nutritional bases.

Eat Vegan on $4 a Day by Ellen Jaffe Jones
In Eat Vegan on $4 a Day, Ellen Jaffe Jones gives tips for how to adapt your favorite recipes, cook with beans and grains, and use bulk buying to reap big savings and eat well on only $4 a day per serving. Forgo expensive processed food and get the most flavor out of delicious high quality basic ingredients. A week's worth of menus, money-saving recipes.

Living Among Meat Eaters: The Vegetarian's Survival Handbook by Carol J. Adams
Always insightful, this practical guide is full of self-tests, strategies, meditations on vegetarianism, and tips for dining out and entertaining at home when meat eaters are on the invite list. Living Among Meat Eaters is sure to become every vegetarian’s most trusted source of support and information.

Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs and Wear Cows by Melanie Joy                                                 I                                                                                              In her groundbreaking new book, Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows, Melanie Joy explores the invisible system that shapes our perception of the meat we eat, so that we love some animals and eat others without knowing why. She calls this system carnism. Carnism is the belief system, or ideology, that allows us to selectively choose which animals become our meat, and it is sustained by complex psychological and social mechanisms. Like other "isms" (racism, ageism, etc.), carnism is most harmful when it is unrecognized and unacknowledged. Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows names and explains this phenomenon and offers it up for examination. Unlike the many books that explain why we shouldn't eat meat, Joy's book explains why we do eat meat -- and thus how we can make more informed choices as citizens and consumers.   http://www.carnism.com/

Quantum Wellness by Kathy Freston

For anyone looking to experience a quantum leap in their overall health comes the ultimate guide to complete-well being—QUANTUM WELLNESS: A Practical and Spiritual Guide to Health and Happiness (Weinstein Books) an instructive book on how to reach our highest level of health and contentment through small, focused changes from New York Timesbestselling author and renowned personal growth counselor Kathy Freston.            

 

 

 

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